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Children in Society: politics, policies and interventions (ed)

Children in Society: politics, policies and interventions (ed)

Craig Newnes

ISBN 978 1 906254 80 3 Published October 2015

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Edited by Craig Newnes,Children in Society: politics. policies and interventions critically investigates the place of children and families in society and the socio-cultural influences affecting children, families and children's services. Contributions from well-respected practitioners and academics provide perspectives on constructing childhood, children and austerity, childhood sexual exploitation, children and ECT,  parenthood, children's sexuality, ADHD, parental blame and responsibility, learning disabilities, and poverty. Contributors include Peter Breggin, Melissa Burkett, Rudi Dallos, Pat Dudgeon, Laura Golding, Dan Goodley and Katherine Runswick-Cole.

‘This book does what it says in the title and is a 'must read' for anyone who works with children, indeed for anyone who has ever been a child. It is beautifully written, compassionate, informative, thought provoking, moving and errudite. Some of the images it evokes will haunt you long after you've put the book down.’ Dr Maggie Robson, Senior Teaching Fellow in Counselling, University of Keele, UK

INTRODUCTION

Protecting children, projecting childhood – Craig Newnes

PART ONE: JUST KIDS?

Children and childhood constructed – Craig Newnes

Constructing innocence and risk as a rationale for intervention – Melissa Burkett

The Stolen Generations: The forced removal of First Peoples children in Australia – Pat Dudgeon, Carmen Cubillo and Abigail Bray 

Children and austerity – Carl Harris 

Single motherhood – Laura Golding

Considering the relationship between vulnerability and child sexual exploitation – Adele Gladman 

PART TWO: JUST SERVICES?

The rights of parents and children in regard to children receiving psychiatric diagnoses and drugs – Peter Breggin 

'Learning-disabled children' – Katherine Runswick-Cole and Dan Goodley

Children and electroconvulsive therapy – Craig Newnes

Looking after children: Love, meaning and connection – Carolyn McQueen 

Don’t Blame the Parents: Is it possible to develop non-blaming models of parental causation of distress? – Rudi Dallos 

The children’s disability living allowance form: Policing dependency with a boundary object – Carl Walker and Orly Klein 
 

To read the Introduction to Children in Society click here

I don’t usually like psychologists, but this book may just have changed my mind …This book enables us to understand the rich vein of critical psychology interested in debating and resisting the widespread adoption of taken-for-granted truths in relation to human psychology in the policy realm …In conclusion, this book has much to add to bolster our critical responses to many of the issues facing children and their families today. As it integrates literature at the intersection of critical theory, psychology and childhood studies, it offers a complex account of these subjects, as well as many interesting applications. Emily Keddell, University of Otago, Aotearoa New Zealand

I loved this book. I think it is virtually unique in the range of topics covered by the authors that relate to both the social construction of childhood and the real life experiences of children. I thoroughly recommend this to all professionals who work with children and young people. Sami Timimi, author, Consultant Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, Visiting Professor of Child Psychiatry and Mental Health Improvement at the University of Lincoln, UK.

This book does what it says in the title and is a 'must read' for anyone who works with children, indeed for anyone who has ever been a child. It is beautifully written, compassionate, informative, thought provoking, moving and erudite. Some of the images it evokes will haunt you long after you've put the book down. Dr Maggie Robson, Senior Teaching Fellow in Counselling, University of Keele, UK

Thoughtful, informed, provocative and never boring.  If your work has anything to do with children, read this book. Anne Cooke, Clinical Director, Doctoral Programme in Clinical Psychology, Canterbury Christ Church University, UK

This is a brilliantly useful, well written and superbly illustrated resource. I'd totally recommend it, even if you don't work with children. It's really interesting and a good book in its own right. Amazon Reviewer

Children in Society is excellent; an extremely fascinating and rewarding read. It is rare to find such a comprehensive collection of writings brought together in one volume. I like the fact that the book is divided into two discrete parts - 'Just Kids?' and 'Just Services?'. Craig Newnes' opening chapter drew me in immediately and made me want to read more. While this collection is essential reading for anyone working with children, it is also a must read for everyone because the content  is current, relevant and topical; so many areas are highlighted for action and further reading and research. The contributors offer a rich and wide ranging collection of writings and I look forward to reading the next edition in this series about children. As a child I was forcibly drugged with psychiatric medications and as an adult I endured treatments of Electro Convulsive Therapy. Sections of the book resonated with me in a painful way. Mostly I found the chapters of the right length and set at the right level so that as a reader it was easy to engage with what the authors were saying … Chapter 9 stands out for me as the best chapter. Generally the collection of contributions is outstanding; very interesting, well written, thought provoking and moving. I learned a lot from my reading and I will recommend this book widely. Judith Haire

'this collection of essays manages to be both eclectic and thorough. It would be a helpful addition to a library or workplace where many practitioners could dip in... it should have wide appeal.' Katharine Cossham MBACP (Accred), Counsellor

Craig Newnes

Craig Newnes

Craig Newnes is editor of The Journal of Critical Psychology, Counselling and Psychotherapy (formerly Changes), and a commissioning editor and author for our Critical Psychology series. Prior to his retirement he was Director of Psychological Therapies for Shropshire. He has a life time commitment to the NHS and is an outspoken critic of the hypocrisy, self interest, confusion and downright lies which characterise so much of the practise of psychiatry and psychology. He believes that unhappiness is a form of heresy and most of the misery for which people seek help is only amenable to alleviation through changes in their material lives.

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