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Encountering Feminism: Intersections between feminism and the person-centred approach

Encountering Feminism: Intersections between feminism and the person-centred approach

Gillian Proctor
Mary Beth Napier

ISBN 978 1 898059 65 3 (2004)

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For many decades, two powerful alternatives to traditional, authoritarian approaches to psychotherapy and human relationships have been developing in parallel yet separate spheres. This is the first book that brings together the powerful forces of feminist and person centered theories to offer a dynamic alternative that is based on principles of mutual relationships, genuineness and respect. While the focus of this book is primarily psychotherapy, it also covers general theories, politics, education and spirituality by European and American authors.

SECTION I—INTRODUCTIONS
Chapter 1 Introduction Gillian Proctor & Mary Beth Napier
Chapter 2 Introduction to Feminist Theory and Therapies Mary Beth Napier
Chapter 3 An Introduction to the Person-Centred Approach Gillian Proctor

SECTION II—THE PERSONAL IS STILL POLITICAL — AND HEALING. PERSONAL REFLECTIONS OF USING PC AND FEMINIST THEORY IN WORK
Chapter 4 A Personal Odyssey: Shaping political and feminist principles in the Person-Centered Approach Gay Barfield
Chapter 5 An Interview with Dr Maureen O’Hara: A pioneer person-centred therapist and feminist reflects on 30 years of process and progress Interviewed by Gillian Proctor
Chapter 6 On Becoming an Activist Rosemary Hopkins
Chapter 7 On Being a Feminist Male J. Wade Hannon
Chapter 8 In Our Humanity is Our Divinity: Interconnections between feminist spirituality and the Person-Centred Approach Deb Steele
SECTION III—AN INTELLECTUAL UNDERSTANDING. NEW THEORIES TO GUIDE OUR ACTIONS
Chapter 9 Toward Convergence: Client-centered and feminist assumptions about epistemology and power Carol Wolter-Gustafson
Chapter 10 Trusting Our Clients: The Stone Centre model of therapy encounters a non-directive attitude Mary Beth Napier
Chapter 11 What Can Person-Centred Therapy Learn From Feminism? Gillian Proctor
Chapter 12 Sexual Abuse: The psychiatric response and the construction of better alternatives Clare Shaw
Chapter 13 Taking Context and Culture into Account in the Core Conditions: A feminist person-centered approach: Randall D. Ehrbar
Chapter 14 Pedagogical Crossroads: Integrating feminist critical pedagogies and the Person-Centered Approach to education Jeff Cornelius-White and Phoebe Godfrey
Chapter 15 New Men? — A new image of man? Person-centred challenges to gender dialogue Peter F. Schmid

SECTION IV—PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS AND SUCCESS STORIES
Chapter 16 Making Sense of Monsters: Working therapeutically with women and children who have experienced sexual violence Edna Davis and Margaret Bird
Chapter 17 Making Connections: Domestic violence, feminism and Person-Centred Therapy Sophie Smailes
Chapter 18 Woman-Centred Practice Monica Hill

This book comprises a collection of papers which explore the relationship between feminist and person-centred theories — their areas of overlap and their areas of divergence. As a feminist and a person-centred practitioner, this is a topic I have thought a lot about, and up until now I have felt extremely frustrated at the paucity of literature on the subject. I was not disappointed. The editors, the Yorkshire-based Gillian Proctor and American Mary Beth Napier, have assembled an appealing cornucopia of essays on the subject, some heavily academic, others written in a more personal sytle. This makes for a varied and surprising read, bursting with ideas and passion. … Postmodernism flowed through this volume, mostly without overt mention, and the interplay between all three of these philosophies provides an exciting and heartening glimpse of a possible future, not just for therapy but for society in general. Encountering Feminism is a shining beacon to light the way to such a future. Yvonne Bates Ipnosis, Number 18, 2005

I thoroughly recommend this book. It re-examines and critiques two abiding philosophies that have influenced my own work and life, reconciles them and shows their relevance to contemporary therapeutic practice. Val Simanowitz, Counsellor, Supervisor, CPJ, April 2005

Gillian Proctor

Gillian Proctor

Dr. Gillian Proctor is an independent Clinical psychologist and person-centred psychotherapist, offering individual therapy and supervision. She is a lecturer in counselling at the University of Leeds and a research supervisor.  She has a particular interest in ethics, politics and power and the importance for counselling from the insights of sociology and philosophy to broaden and deepen our understandings of relationships and ethics. 

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Mary Beth Napier

Mary Beth Napier

I am a clinical psychologist, supervisor of therapy students, teacher and conduct neuropsychological assessments. In each of these areas, feminism and client-centered principles guide my actions and attitudes towards others. I feel privileged to have the opportunity to add writer and editor to the list of activities that give me life. In previous years I have been a campus, youth and music minister and a spirited camp counselor. All of these activities have taught me to listen carefully, to love passionately and to work diligently to create connections between people and between ideas.

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